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    Blog posts of '2018' 'December'

    (0) Kwanzaa: Night Six - Kuumba
    Creativity: Kuumba (koo–OOM–bah) To do always as much as we can, in the way we can, in order to leave our community more beautiful and beneficial than we inherited it. Kikombe Cha Umoja: The Unity Cup The kikombe cha umoja is a special cup that is used to perform the libation (tambiko) ritual duri...
    (0) Kwanzaa: Night Five - Nia
    Purpose: Nia (nee–YAH) To make our collective vocation the building and developing of our community in order to restore our people to their traditional greatness. Kinara: The Candleholder The kinara is the center of the Kwanzaa setting and represents the original stalk from which we came: our ance...
    (0) Kwanzaa: Night Four - Ujamaa
    Cooperative Economics: Ujamaa (oo–JAH–mah) To build and maintain our own stores, shops, and other businesses and to profit from them together. Mishumaa Saba: The Seven Candles Candles are ceremonial objects with two primary purposes: to re-create symbolically the sun’s power and to provide light. ...
    (0) Kwanzaa: Night Three - Ujima
    Collective Work and Responsibility: Ujima (oo–GEE–mah) To build and maintain our community together and make our brother’s and sister’s problems our problems and to solve them together. Vibunzi: Ear of Corn The stalk of corn represents fertility and symbolizes that through the reproduction of chil...
    (0) Kwanzaa: Night Two - Kujichagulia
    Self-determination: Kujichagulia (koo–gee–cha–goo–LEE–yah) To define ourselves, name ourselves, create for ourselves, and speak for ourselves. Mkeka: Place Mat The mkeka, made from straw or cloth, comes directly from Africa and expresses history, culture, and tradition. It symbolizes the historica...
    (0) Kwanzaa: Night One - Umoja
    Unity:Umoja (oo–MO–jah) To strive for and maintain unity in the family, community, nation, and race. Mazao, the crops (fruits, nuts, and vegetables) Symbolizes work and the basis of the holiday. It represents the historical foundation for Kwanzaa, the gathering of the people that is patterned afte...
    (0) Kwanzaa: The Colors
    Red, Black and Green The colors of Kwanzaa are a reflection of the Pan-African movement representing “unity” for peoples of African descent worldwide: Black for the people, red for the noble blood that unites all people of African ancestry, and green for the rich land of Africa. ...
    (0) Kwanzaa
    Kwanzaa The name Kwanzaa is derived from the phrase “matunda ya kwanza” which means “first fruits” in Swahili. Each family celebrates Kwanzaa in its own way, but celebrations often include songs and dances, African drums, storytelling, poetry reading, and a large traditional meal. On each of the s...
    (0) Why Body Oil Prices Can Be So Different From One Place To The Next
    [embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kzJpMU7mLf0[/embed]...
    (0) The Meaning of Mudcloth
    [embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NuwWyFuMM_A[/embed]...
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